List of the Festivals and Celebrations throughout Costa Rica.

Here is a comprehensive list of the Festivals and Celebrations throughout Costa Rica.

January
New Year’s Day
—Revelers who were partying in the clubs the night before gather in San José’s Parque Central and Buenos Aires, and Puntarenas to continue the festivities.  It’s a wild time.
Fiesta Palmares —Traditional (no bloodshed) bullfights, live music, folk dancing, carnival with rides and games take place the first two week of the year in Palmares
Fiesta Santa Cruz—The fiesta in Santa Cruz on the Nicoya peninsula takes place the second week in January and has a western flair with bullfights and a parade followed by a party with food, concerts and fireworks.
Día de Santo Cristo de Esquipulas—Popular religious festival celebrated with fiestas and dancing in Alajuelita.

February
Fiesta de los Diablitos—The festival of the little devils takes place in the second half of February. This celebration is a re-enactment of a battle between the toro (Spanish troops) and the diablitos (Boruca Indians).  The Baruka mask is beautifully hand carved.  You will see traditional costumes, great food and fireworks complete the scene in Rey Curre south of San Isidro.
Ash Wednesday—Again, given the Costa Rica’s Catholic faith, this is a very sacred day across all areas of the country
Carnival and Festival del Mar—A week of local celebrations in Puntarenas and Quepos including street fairs and fiestas, dancing and sporting events.

March
Día de los Boyeros
— Get you cameras ready in San Antonio in Escazú on the second Sunday in March! The  parade of beautifully handmade and painted oxcarts are surrounded by traditional costumes, food and dancing. There also is a driving competition.
Día de San José—Saint Joseph is the patron saint of the capital city, San José, and is a national holiday where banks, schools and businesses are typically closed. Special masses are said across the entire country in celebration of Saint Joseph.

April
Semana Santa
—Holy week is one of the biggest observed times in Costa Rica. Holy Thursday and Good Friday prior to Easter Sunday are celebrated with masses and processions.  There is NO Public transportation on Thursday and Friday and NO alcohol sales Thursday and Friday.  This is a very busy and crowded week to come to Costa Rica.
Fiesta San Vincente de Moravia—Another toro a la Tica (Bulls without bloodshed) street fair with music, dancing, and traditional food.
Easter—Family and religious observations are held throughout the country.
Día de Juan Santamaría—Although this is a national holiday the majority of activities are held in Alajuela.  The day honors a young fighter from Alajuela who defended Costa Rica to the death against William Walkers forces at the battle of Rivas in 1856.
Fiesta San Rafael de Santa Ana—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).
Fiesta Tarrazu—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).

May
Día de los Trabajadores
—This is Costa Rican Labor Day which is filled with parades, marches and traditional food.  This is also the day for  the “state of the union” address from the President to Congress and the people of Costa Rica. Costa Rica does NOT have an Army.

Fiesta Pattronale Desamparados—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed)
Día de San Isidro Labrador— This holiday is celebrated all over Costa Rica honoring the patron saint of farmers with blessings of animals and crops. There are street fairs and parades with music, dancing and traditional food.

Fiestas Pattronales San Marcos de Tarrazu, and Coronado—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).

June
Fiestas Pattronales Trinidad de Moravia, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, Leon Cortes, and San Jeronimo—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).
Día de los Padres—This is the traditional Father’s Day in Costa Rica
Fiesta San Juan de Tibas—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed)
Día de San Pedro y San Pablo—Saint Peter and Saint Paul’s are marked by a day with processions and masses.

July
Fiesta de La Virgen del Mar—The Fiesta of the Virgin of the Sea on the Saturday closest to the 16th is marked in Puntarenas by a procession of decorated fishing boats carrying the city’s patron Saint the statue of La Virgen del Monte Carmelo There’s also a celebratory mass. The secular celebrations include a week of parades, dances, regattas, parades and fireworks. Playas del Coco also celebrates the Virgin of the Sea.
Día de Guanacaste—Guanacaste Day celebrates the annexation of Guancaste from Nicaragua in 1824. Street fiestas, folk dancing, topes (horse show/parade), traditional bullfights, rodeos and cattle shows are colorful and great photo opportunities

August
Virgen de Los Angeles
— This National holiday celebrates the patron saint of Costa Rica; La Negrita. Pilgrims come from all over the country for the special mass at Cartago and a religious procession from San José to La Basilica de Cartago.  The sick come to her year round for she is said to have healing powers.
Fiesta Ciudad Colon (San Carlos)—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).
Día de la Madre, Feast of the Assumption—Mother’s day is a National holiday.  All banks, school and most businesses are closed. Fiesta Pattronale Aserri—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).

September
Independence Day—Costa Rica gained independence from Spain on the same day as the rest of Central America in 1821. The nationwide celebration starts with parades, traditional dancers, and street parties and culminates with the arrival of the Freedom Torch in Cartago (delivered from Nicaragua by relay runners) when everyone in the country stops and simultaneously sings the national anthem. Later in the day, children carry small lanterns through their towns.  This is one of Costa Rica’s biggest celebrations.

October
Fiesta Pattronale San Francisco de Dos Ríos
—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).
Carnival/ Día de la Raza —Think Río on the streets of Límon, Costa Rica. This celebration of Columbus’ arrival in the new world culminates on October 12.  It caps off several days of Carnival on the Caribbean coast. Although it is the rainy season, it is a must see event!
Fiesta Pattronale Escazú—One of the wealthiest areas of Costa Rica, this street fair has music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).

November
Día de los Muertos—(All Soul’s Day) A very religious and sad day observed across all of Costa Rica with Catholic masses and pilgrimages to visit dead loved ones.
El Desfile de Carretas—One of the largest parades of ox-carts takes place in San José.  Definitely a colorful celebration.

December
Festival de la Luz—(Festival of Lights) This is San José’s weeklong event is marked by lighting displays, concerts and fireworks.
Fiesta Pattronale Pavas—Street fair with music, dancing, traditional food and toro a la Tica (bullfights without the bloodshed).
Fiesta de la Yeguita—Bullfights and a parade followed by a party in the parque central of Nicoya with food, concerts and fireworks.
Misa de Gallo—(Mass of the Rooster)This is traditional Christmas eve.
Christmas Week—Not an official holiday but the week of Christmas is so commonly observed throughout the country.Christmas Day—Family get togethers after Christmas mass
Tope Caballos—The horses parade throughout downtown San José proudly displays the equine traditions and unique Criollo breed of horses.

Originally post here: AllthingsCostaRica

Categories: Festivals & Holidays | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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